French Cleat “How to make”

I’m surprised how often people google and find my blog searching for information on how make a french cleat.
So to make it easier here is a drawing explaining a french cleat.
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click on the pic for a clearer larger pic.

The easy way to fit a French Cleat in position

French Cleat 2

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Dorade Boxes Finished

Holes drilled out and stainless steel screws fitted.

I wanted stainless steel countersunk slotted screws I didn’t want to use phillips or posidrive. Now you just try finding 70mm long stainless steel slotted countersunk wood screws, these were sourced from Southern Ireland and cost a mint. 😦

The deck they are to be fitted to has a slight curve. So on the left is a template I made, you can see a distinct curve in the lower edge. The dorade is sitting on some bits of ply that copy the curve. This means I have had to cut a slight curve into the bottom of the dorade box for it to sit perfectly.

On the left and looking tired a Plastimo dorade box with cowl. Along side my home made dorade boxes.

Similar in size was a must, the new ones have to fit within the deck guard that protects the dorade from fouling any loose sheets (rope) flying around on deck.

One turned the opposite to the other, this is how they will be normally used.

Just a good rub down with some fine wire wool and that’s it they are finished. 🙂

Final glue up of Dorade Box

Not really gussets they are really to guide the screws into pilot holes drilled in the teak deck. In the far dorade you can just make out where I’ve drilled and counter sunk through the top, when the glue set properly I’ll drill again from the tops down through the gussets.

You can see the drain holes or scuppers cut in the lower edge of the box in this pic.

🙂

Dorade Box Design & Build

I need to make two dorade boxes out of teak and as I’m not impressed with any thing I’ve seen on the net like this traditional one pictured here I’ve decided I’ll go with my own design.

These are the cowls I have bought to use, they are made by Marinetech in Germany. Delivery was only six days. I could have bought similar ones from the USA but was put off by the freight costs and IMHO the German ones are better built, a little like their cars 😀

So here is my design, approximately 320mm (13″) Long, 90mm (31/2″) high at it’s highest point, 200mm (8″) wide.

I made a sixteen pointed circle using Photoshop 7 and printed it out to the correct size here it is along side the plug I’ve made and you can see I’ve transferred all the lines onto the plug to get the sizing for all the parts I’ll need.

Using the marks on the plug I need a grand total of thirty two straight sides and with edges cut with 11 degree angled sides and with the top and bottoms angled at 20deg, Thirty two pointed parts same lengths as the straight sides and cut at the bottom and top again to 20deg. It sounds a lot but remember I’m making two dorade boxes.
In this pic I show two of the straight pieces and one of the pointed pieces.

Taking two straight pieces and one pointed part this pic already shows them glued up, no clamps needed I simply held them together with several rubber bands.

Same part just pictured the other was up.

Two of the three piece parts glued together and with such an awkward piece you can see I’ve had to improvise a way to clamp them. Two more glue ups and the rounded ends should be done for one of the dorade boxes.

So after a few days away I’ve done some more to the Dorade Boxes,

I fiber glassed the insides of the cone to add strength it can be clearly seen here.
This is one of the cones cut up and a complete cone is in the background. The near left hand part is what will become the rear of the box, to the right of that is what will become the front, and the thin bit on the far right is waste, cut off to the same thickness as what will be the top.

After careful marking the centre line and cutting the cone into two parts on the bandsaw, one half needs cutting to make the front part of the dorade box. Do you like my home made gauge? 🙂

It becomes a little clearer in this pic. A simple glue up, but I had to make some wedges to keep the clamp angles correct.

Just needs the round cap glued on a baffle plate inserted inside and some drain holes cut along the bottom edge and the boxes are nearly finished. So this is what they look like up to now. 🙂

In this pic you can see the glue is still wet 🙂

Not really gussets they are really to guide the screws into pilot holes drilled in the teak deck. In the far dorade you can just make out where I’ve drilled and counter sunk through the top, when the glue set properly I’ll drill again from the tops down through the gussets.

You can see the drain holes or scuppers cut in the lower edge of the box in this pic.

Holes drilled out and stainless steel screws fitted.

I wanted stainless steel countersunk slotted screws I didn’t want to use phillips or posidrive. Now you just try finding 70mm long stainless steel slotted countersunk wood screws, these were sourced from Southern Ireland and cost a mint. 😦

The deck they are to be fitted to has a slight curve. So on the left is a template I made, you can see a distinct curve in the lower edge. The dorade is sitting on some bits of ply that copy the curve. This means I have had to cut a slight curve into the bottom of the dorade box for it to sit perfectly.

On the left and looking tired a Plastimo dorade box with cowl. Along side my home made dorade boxes.

Similar in size was a must, the new ones have to fit within the deck guard that protects the dorade from fouling any loose sheets (rope) flying around on deck.

One turned the opposite to the other, this is how they will be normally used.

Just a good rub down with some fine wire wool and that’s it they are finished. 🙂

Wednesday 16th March, just fitted the dorades on the boat, the first pic is a reminder of what I replaced

Pic of old dorade

Pics of the new dorades fitted in place.

That’s them finished then 🙂 thanks must go to my wonderful wife June who cleaned both heads from head to toe… It might be worth saying that during the making of the dorades I removed the old ones and to make the decks water tight I covered both vent holes with plastic bags secured with gaffa tape, BIG MISTAKE They were only covered for about a month but in that time the head where these dorades were out of commission got attacked with mould growth the like I have never seen before even though I had my de-humidifier running. This makes one realize the need for good working dorades. 🙂

Project X

My next project, I’ve got to make two.
Anyone like to guess what it is?

It has a proper name and only that will be accepted. 🙂

Some Mods to my Tool Cabinet

I have added felt to match the door holding the chisel racks, and at the same time added the small saw rack for my dovetail saws. I have found the felt eliminates any rust attacking the tools.